How to Look

at a House


A blog with answers
to your questions about
HOME INSPECTION
and HOME MAINTENANCE

Click Below to Link
to Collections of
Blog Posts by Subject

Search This Blog

Welcome to our blog!
We want you to be an informed homebuyer, and each blog post is a question that we have answered for our friends and customers over the years. Hope they help you make a good choice for your next home.

   And while it is possible that one of those three costly replacement items may have a surprisingly long life, it’s also true that the likelihood of one of them requiring replacement soon is almost 100%.

   So average lifespan charts help you to estimate what big-ticket replacement expenses you can reasonably expect in the first years after you purchase a home. Condo association managers use the charts also, to prepare detailed budgets for expected replacement cycles for each building component. This forms the basis for part of the monthly assessments--setting aside an amount each month for the estimated future date of a roof replacement for the entire complex, for example. You can do the same thing on a smaller scale, as a buffer against the inevitable future expenses of owning a home.

    We have based the lifespan estimates on three sources:

  1. 1)The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) “Study of Life Expectancy of Home Components,” compiled in 2006.

  2. 2)The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) “Standard Estimated Lifespan Expectancy for Homes.”

  3. 3)Our own experience in inspecting over 7,000 homes in both South and North Florida.

    The spread in years of the average lifespan ratings is due to multiple factors, which include things like quality of the manufactured product, weather exposure, maintenance, and level of usage.


While we hope you find this series of articles about home inspection helpful, they should not be considered an alternative to an actual home inspection by a local inspector. Also, construction standards vary in different parts of the country and it is possible that important issues related to your area may not be covered here.
© McGarry and Madsen Inspection


More Blog Posts on Similar Subjects:

  1. Should a home inspection scare you?

  2. What is the difference between an appraisal and a home inspection?

  3. Are you licensed and insured?

  4. We looked at the house carefully, and it seems alright. Do we really need a home inspection?

  5. Is a home inspection required?

  6. What is the difference between “character” and a defect in an old house?

  7. Should I be there for the inspection?

  8. What tools do you use for a home inspection?

  9. Is it common for an insurance company to require an inspection?

  10. The seller has to fix everything you find wrong with the house, right?

  11. Can I do my own home inspection?

  12. Is it still possible to do an inspection if there’s no electricity or water?

  13. What’s the difference between a roof inspection and a roofing estimate?

  14. Should I hire an engineer to inspect the house?

  15. Do inspectors go on the roof? Do they get in the attic?

  16. What should I look for when buying a former rental house?

  17. What happens at a home inspection?

  18. Does the home inspector also check for termites?

  19. What different types of specialized inspections can I get?

  20. What are the questions a home inspector won’t answer?

  21. What is the difference between a building inspector and a home inspector?

  22. What do I need to know about buying a 1950s house?

  23. What is the difference between a home inspection and a final walkthrough inspection?

  24. Should the seller be at the home inspection?

  25. What is the average lifespan of a house?

  26. What are the common problems to look for when buying a 1960s home?

  27. Should I use my realtor’s home inspector or choose one myself?

  28. Should I use a contractor or a home inspector to inspect a house I’m buying?

  29. Should I get a home inspection before signing a contract to buy the house?

  30. Can a home inspector do repairs to a house after doing the inspection?

  31. What is a “continuous load path”?

  32. When did the first Florida Building Code (FBC) begin and become effective?

  33. Should I only hire an inspector that is a member of a national association like ASHi, InterNACHI, or NAHI?

  34. What is a “cosmetic” defect in a home inspection?

  35. Where are the funny home inspection pictures?

  36. Should I follow the inspector around during the inspection?

  37. Why do realtors call some home inspectors “deal killers”?

  38. How can I reduce the risk of an expensive surprise when buying a house sight unseen?

  39. Does my home have to be inspected to get insurance?

  40. Who should pay for the home inspection?

  41. Can you do a home inspection in the rain?

  42. What are the most Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) at a home inspection?

  43. What are the common causes of ceiling stains in a house?