More Blog Posts on Home Inspection:

  1. The seller has to fix everything you find wrong with the house, right?

  2. Can I do my own home inspection?

  3. What should I look for when buying a former rental house?

  4. Should a home inspection scare you?

  5. We looked at the house carefully, and it seems alright. Do we really need a home inspection?

  6. What is the difference between an appraisal and a home inspection?

  7. Are you licensed and insured?

  8. Do you see similar problems with houses in the same neighborhood?

  9. What is the difference between a building inspector and a home inspector?

  10. Should I hire an engineer to inspect the house?

  11. What happens at a home inspection?

  12. Is it still possible to do an inspection if there’s no electricity or water?

  13. Does the home inspector also check for termites?

  14. What tools do you use for a home inspection?

  15. What problems do you look for when a house has been vacant or abandoned?

  16. What problems should I look for when buying a country house in a rural area?

  17. How much does a home inspection cost?

  18. What is an egress window?

  19. Do you have any home inspection tips for buyers?

  20. What is the difference between an FHA inspection and a home inspection?

  21. What is the average lifespan of a house?

  22. What are the common problems to look for when buying a 1980s house?

  23. Why is a double cylinder deadbolt lock on an exterior door a safety hazard?

  24. Should I use my realtor’s home inspector or choose one myself?

  25. Should I get a home inspection before signing a contract to buy the house?

  26. What makes a house fail the home inspection?

  27. What tips do first-time homebuyers need to know to get a better home inspection?

  28. Does a home inspector give cost estimates for repairs?

  29. What inspections does a bank or mortgage lender need for loan approval?

  30. Should I buy a house that has been remodeled/renovated without building permits or has open permits?

  31. Why do home inspectors sometimes specify “further evaluation and possible repair” instead of a specific repair or replacement?

  32. The one question we get asked most often: “Will that be in the report?”

How to Look

at a House


A blog with answers
to your questions about
HOME INSPECTION
and HOME MAINTENANCE

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Welcome to our blog!
We want you to be an informed homebuyer, and each blog post is a question that we have answered for our friends and customers over the years. Hope they help you make a good choice for your next home.

   There are times when a condo inspection may seem appropriate but is not recommended. Planned Unit Developments (commonly called “PUDs”) are one example. They are similar, but not the same as a condo, in that the homeowner’s association is responsible for a limited part of building and site maintenance.

    Older condos that are townhouse-style construction are best evaluated with a full inspection. While you are not responsible for the condition of the exterior, a complete inspection will give you a list of any exterior components that are deteriorated for you to call to the attention of the association for repair before they get worse.

  To learn more about the home inspection process, we suggest reading several of our other blogs. Check out What questions should I ask a home inspector I’m considering hiring?” for HUD’s ten suggested questions for evaluating a potential home inspector. To get a list of suggested items to bring with you to improve your home inspection experience, see “What should I bring to the home inspection?”. See “What questions should I ask the home inspector during the inspection?” for ways to get the information you need from the inspector. And visit “What is the best way to negotiate repairs after the home inspection?” for tips on working with your realtor to get any necessary repairs worked out with the seller.


While we hope you find this series of articles about home inspection helpful, they should not be considered an alternative to an actual home inspection by a local inspector. Also, construction standards vary in different parts of the country and it is possible that important issues related to your area may not be covered here.
©2015 - McGarry and Madsen Inspection.

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