How to Look

at a House


A blog with answers
to your questions about
HOME INSPECTION
and HOME MAINTENANCE

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Welcome to our blog!
We want you to be an informed homebuyer, and each blog post is a question that we have answered for our friends and customers over the years. Hope they help you make a good choice for your next home.

   Here’s the rub: if you make an offer on the home, and the bank accepts it, the house has to be de-winterized in order to do a proper home inspection. And, when the inspection is complete, it often requires re-winterizing. Some banks handle this for the buyer through the listing agent, and some don’t. And sometimes the bank requires the buyers to arrange, at their expense, for the utilities to be turned on briefly for the inspection--which is not an easy process.
   For the really cheap “bargain” properties, you may not be allowed to turn the utilities on at all. It’s as is, where is; take it or leave it. But a competent home inspector can still tell you a lot about the condition of the home and its components during a “dry” inspection--we just don’t like to do it that way, because there are invariably a few unpleasant surprises when the utilities kick on.

   When you see the bank’s winterization notice in the front window of a property that you want to make an offer on, be sure to find out from your realtor how de-winterizing works with that particular financial institution, so you know what to expect when you proceed with the home inspection.

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  To read about issues related to homes of an specific era or type of house, visit one of these blog posts:

What are the common problems to look for when buying a 1950s house?

  1. What are the common problems to look for when buying a 1960s home?

  2. What are the common problems to look for when buying a 1970s home?

  3. What are the common problems to look for when buying a 1980s house?

  4. What problems should I look for when buying a country house or rural property?

  5. What problems should I look when when buying a house that has been moved?

  6. What problems should I look for when buying a house that has been vacant or abandoned?

  7. What are the most common problems with older mobile homes?

  8. What should I look for when buying a “flipper” house?

  9. What should I look for when buying a former rental house?


While we hope you find this series of articles about home inspection helpful, they should not be considered an alternative to an actual home inspection by a local inspector. Also, construction standards vary in different parts of the country and it is possible that important issues related to your area may not be covered here.
©2015 - McGarry and Madsen Inspection.

 

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